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professional educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their s
another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is educatio
thrive. and our educators can teach. we are fortunate to have trained professionals on our campuses. including social workers and nurses and wellness services. and ladies and gentlemen, if not for the largess of the san francisco voting community, we would not be able to do this. we want to thank you for the voting of our schools. when you go to the ballot box and vote for the parcel tax and bonds, this is what you vote for. the systems that keep people safe. and we want to thank you. and we have wellness centers and as you know it takes a village. we will stand with those in our community and across the great state of california. to ensure that students have safe places to learn and thrive and adults have great place to work. as you know i had the honor last friday to serve as the master of ceremonies of our board commissioners, and it was great to see family and friends and supporters to come out to support our board of seeducatio. we look forward to have a productive year for with all of you. and i want to thank ester costo with the work she did organizing. and the principal, jul
wanted to point out that the board, the rules committee and the board of education it remains in the process of re-examining all of our policies. on which the rules of board is one section. that's why the format looks change. and not throughout here, and we are still in the process of doing that, and just to reiterate there are sections that we assigned to various committees not the rules committee. and the grounds commission and the curriculum section to the curriculum committee, etc.. and we hope to complete that this year. >> thank you, any other comments from the board? roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> mendoza. >> yes. dr. murase. >> aye. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by aye or nay.
shows huge role in education, and i look for someone to have impact on me. she educates with fun, she deserving this award because of her passionate input and i would like mr. tim allen to share this award. >> thank you, and good evening board of education and ladies and gentlemen. it is my honor to be here tonight. i get the opportunity to travel throughout california and make presentations at board meetings. and as you can imagine, some of them are quite interesting. but tonight i have a very good feeling about what is going on in this district. and congratulations to you, and what you have done. just seeing these students and the quality of the work they have learned is a testament to what you are doing in this district. i would like to share with you briefly the history of this award. i think it brings more meaning to what we are doing for teac r teache teachers. the carlson family began a company in the late 70s. and they took 5% of their profits and encouraged their employees to go out and work for not-for-profit in the bay area. and they could come back and ask for grants in s
to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say someth
else, the other part of that strategy and that goal is to do a much more serious education marketing campaign. we've got to educate everybody using our streets. so, we're choosing today in the middle of the beginning of our holiday season with everybody's attention on having great fun, having wonderful events, having serious sales that allow people to shop, this is where the consciousness has to be risen. and, so, in light of this, we picked this day and this time and this area of year to make this announcement that we have a pedestrian strategy that's going on, a serious one. we're jointly doing it with the collaboration of all the different departments. we have asked and part of the strategy will be our police department, really doing a lot more enforcement strategically in all the areas that we need to, with not only stops, not only enforcement and ticketing, but a serious effort to remind people that these are going to be spots where we are going to pay a lot more attention. we have the mta, with ed's leadership and his staff, parking and traffic and others, working to do some of
of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particul
the country. because the data shared by our u.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site
. issues i care about, really care about. education has always been very center to the things i have been involved with. i am a former teacher also. i work in the early childhood education field for 18 years running an organization. those are parts of my dna. other things that people are not aware of, i do care about health environment in san francisco. i want to make sure that we have enough health facilities to serve all san francisco, not just one part of the city. i want to make sure that our small businesses are supported. why? i come from a family where we had a small grocery store. i understand what it means to run a small business. maybe people think about 500 people is a small business. i'm talking about businesses that drive neighborhoods, support neighborhoods, give jobs to people in those neighborhoods. i want to work with others on the board of supervisors to improve the conditions support them , and make them thrive. those are some of the things, education, the economy. now that we are through the downturn, and dealt with the cuts, we want to make sure that is we impr
schools. i went into all of my schools. >> one of his schools was noyes education campus. >> when i went into noyes i was very impressed. >> a typical inner city school, noyes was an example of what rhee hoped to accomplish. the year before she arrived, its principal, wayne ryan, had raised test scores in reading and math over 20 points. >> he said he was going to make the same gains this year as they did last year. >> no, if we made the samewe gains, the chancellor's going to take my entire staff out to dinner. >> rhee was so impressed by ryan's success that she featured him in this recruitment ad. >> you were like a poster child. >> good morning, everyone. >> standardized tests like the dc cas, which ryan had used at noyes, were mandated in 2002 by a federal law called no child left behind. their scores enabled federal officials to measure progress at individual schools. >> now, how many of you know about no child left behind? what does that law say? it basically says that by the year 2014, every child in the united states should be proficient in english and in mathematics. >> poor sco
for them to be educated. they want to be educated. we worked out some of the plans for -- because i met with the college trustees and i will be meeting with them again on thursday. there are a lot of promises have been made to the trustees about what puc would do, but nothing has been done. and what i'm here is to talk about -- to see that things get started because school starts next monday. and i've asked one of the trustees to come and speak with you also on public comment. and the other concern that i have, great concern, is that the college itself. the college had 33,000 square feet of space when they opened up in 1986. now, because of some politicking and playing went on, they are down to 17,000 feet, square feet. that college should be all 33,000 square feet for the classes that we had that was given to other colleges. and the programs are coming back. i've talked with of the trustees and they are willing and their sending some of our programs back, and they all are coming back and we want an addition of services in my community because they cannot go outside of the area. so, wha
on traditional liberal arts education. . >> woodruff: ray suarez looks into china's current crackdown on the internet and on its own news media, which is drawing protests. >> ifill: and we remember pulitzer prize-winning journalist richard ben cramer, whose work spanned presidential politics and the lives of superstar athletes. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: saving for the heart. you'll be able to get close to iconic landmarks. to cultural places. it's a feeling that you can only get. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world viking river cruises, explore the world >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank y. >> woodruff: the renewed concern over mass shootings
transportation to education, to preserving the capabilities of our national guard. while each governor has his or her own unique circumstances, we all have to facilitate job growth, improve schools, and be financially responsible. as much as we do in our states, our economies are tightly linked to the national economy, and as a result, our state's prosperity, the prosperity of our citizen depends in no small measure on the ability of all public servants in washington to come together on a path forward. uncertainty here in federal support hurts both our economies and the federal budget, and the implications are incredibly important. governors have been working with the president, the vice president, and congressional leadership to find solutions to help put our country back on firm financial footing. one of the largest elements of the uncertainty concerned elements of the fiscal cliff that were either postponed or taken out of the reason -- recent relief act of 2012 as the only postponed reducing grants to states. intimate reform was not addressed, and no action was taken regarding the federal
efforts to reduce violence, whether it's education, social services, housing, none of that escapes us as to their link in efforts to reduce violence in our society. with that i want to thank everybody for coming today. and i would ask everyone in san francisco, if not the whole region and the state, to please join us in a national moment of silence that will occur tomorrow morning east coast time, it will be 9:30 a.m., and here in san francisco it will be 6:30 a.m. for a national moment of silence to remember all the victims in sandy hook. of course, at the same time, remember all the victims at our own locally it victims of gun violence. and before and after this moment of silence we will be active doing the things we need to do to reduce violence in our city. thank you. >> okay, good morning. thank you all for coming out today. we're very happy to be here. my name is ed rifkin, i'm the other ed, director of transportation. and as the transportation director, i oversee the sfmta which is the agency that is charged with implementing the city's transit first policy. and what our goal,
education these days is the recent explosion of free online courses. universities are grappling with their impact on teaching and liberal arts education. newshour corresondent spencer michels has our story. >> mark this with d and in a valueive the term you mark with e. >> reporter: tracy lippincott, who works in a san francisco bar, is taking a college course in her apartment, online, on how to reason and argue. the teacher is walter sinnott- armstrong, professor of ethics at duke university in north carolina, and the class is free. >> so how do you learn the technique? the answer is very simple. you practice, and then you practice again, and then you practice and practice and practice and practice. this class has these really short little lectures, which is great because you can kind of watch one, and then think about it and react, and then you don't have to watch another whole hour like you would in class. >> reporter: "think again" is a class presented by a one-year- old for-profit startup called coursera, currently the nation's largest provider of free online courses. 170,0
, that they will survive? i think we can all agree when we began our careers in education, we did it because children deserved better. to thrive and placed in situations to be successful. our jobs. mine, yours, are to remove those obstacles in front of them. and to do our best to give them that path to success. moving this will place a major obstacle in their way. these are students that have dealt with years of ada construction. and last year there was a fire and they were without a cafeteria and not to mention lost every book in the library. they have had to endure so much. and those who could help, and you are about to throw a huge obstacle in our way. i ask is this the best you can do? have you consulted with all parties? are you proud of the work you have done, and the decisions you are about to make? in my opinion unless you have received the answers that you are satisfied with, then you hand the work back to them and say, try again. [applause] >> good evening, i am melissa, the president of the board of creative arts charter school. i appreciate the opportunity to give comment. but really i wo
, 2013. discussion of other educational, issues none. and item n, none. item o, we will vote on the calendar for one item that was severed. roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas. >> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> aye. >> item p, consent calendar resolutions, this our audit, 2-c, and our auditor is in the audience. >> i first want to congratulate president norton and vice president fewer, on your new titles. we have with us tonight leonard dana, to give you a short presentation on our 2011-12 audit. the company has done our audits for six or seven years now. and mr. dana has been a partner on this for three years now i think. >> i am on my second go around. >> exactly. >> usually when we present the audit reports, we usually have a lot to talk about. because of the findings. but i went back and looked at prior reports. and i didn't find one that didn't have one comment in them. and some comments if you go back in time, they are more than ticky-tack items, they were fairly serious items. and it shows from my perspective wher
are the options for a solid student in this system? how can we get a good education for kesean? how can we plan alternative for what is not providing him with a challenged or adequate education? any places for me to pursue this? >> we have you get with the chief of staff, and have the middle schools to follow up with you. >> to whom do i give this? thank you. >> good evening ladies and gentlemen of the board of education. i hope you remember me from last time. two minutes was not enough. i am back. i would like to address any questions you have concerning nonviolent parenting and what is the obstacle of having these installed in the schools. the problem question is what happens when a child makes a mistake over and over. the response to that question is that you make a new rule until that child continues the behavior. and they compensate their victims, and being punitive. hopefully this is a behavior they will adopt as adults. another frequently asked question, what is a mistake. we define a mistake for a small child as dangerous or destru destructive. as they get older we expand mistake in eth
bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i belie
and replenish our beaches. our department of education has worked night and day to get schools reopened right away, and where that wasn't possible, to get them restored by the next school year, all while maintaining our commitment to a full 180-day school year of education for our kids. executive order 107 makes sure that when insurance payments do come, they are not compromised by excessive deductibles and ensures that our citizens maximize their reimbursement. while there are dozens of other examples of the never quit attitude of this administration and our citizens, there is none better than the miracle of route 35 in mantoloking. at the mantoloking bridge, route 35 had been completely washed away by sandy. i stood at the spot where the atlantic ocean flowed into the bay where route 35 once carried thousands of cars a day to vacations down the shore. within days, commissioner jim simpson, the department of transportation and our private sector partners had a temporary road built to allow emergency vehicles onto the island. now, merely 10 weeks after our state's worst storm, you see a perma
-ups, we are taking steps to make sure conn leads again. when it came to education, the stakes were clear. take action together or risk losing an entire generation of young people to failing schools and a widening achievement gap. i am proud that after a long and hard debate, we were able to say with one voice, that the status quo was no locker acceptable. that when it comes to public education, we cannot keep doing what we have always done and simply hope for better results. that our kids cannot afford it and our state cannot afford it as well. we work with an eye towards a future and have made an historic investment of nearly $100 million from three k to high- school, focusing on those districts that are most in need. reaching kids early is critical to the success and early childhood education had to be a central portion of our education reform. so we created 1000 new school readiness opens statewide for youngsters at a time when no one thought that it was possible. that is 1000 more children that will show up to kindergarten this fall ready to learn. we did that together, and we will d
student who's determined to help young people around the world get a higher education. >>> for decades ethnic minorities from myanmar fled conflict with the former military government to seek refuge in thailand. for many refugee camps are the only home they've ever known. they grew up and went to school in the camps, learning their own ethnic language. but with reconciliation under way in myanmar, educators face a new challenge. how to prepare for the day when the refugees can go home. nhk world's toshiyuki terazawa has the story. >> reporter: children attend an elementary school at the refugee camp in thailand, near the border with myanmar. the camp houses ethnic -- who have left myanmar. refugees have lived in this camp for decades. over the time children have grown up being educated in their native language. refugee leaders created their own education program with the support of organizations including the united nations. this is one of the people responsible. her group set up some 150 schools from nurseries to colleges at seven refugee camps in thailand. >> nearly over 60 years we
justice and people say "that's san francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you ju
to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self regulation and other skills and specific focus and exciting working with them the past year and a half or so so i want people to have a look here, and what i would like to do is tie some of the things together that you have been hearing about today and in terms of bullying prevention, other prevention work going on in your state and in terms of promoting positive behaviors with youth, and so sometimes
thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don'
the fruit and play with the chicken. it is as much of educational outreach and increase our interaction with our community 100 fold. this is the second season. this has brought us closer to our community. gerri: if you cannot grow a vegetable garden, i do you have any rights at all how to use your own property that you pay for? >> we pay taxes we have owned the land 20 years. it is our property. when they take our garden, what is next? >> asserts with food they slowly take away everything. it is not a hobby. gerri: it is not like it is marijuana. right? >> not surprising that a business show was the first national one to pick it up. it is about money we save thousands of dollars per year because of our healthy nutritious organic garden. it re-read to a garage restore it would cost a lot of money and we get that for free. gerri: somebody has to tend the garden. not totally free. [laughter] let us know what happens. says the city really go away? keep us in the loop with what is happening. we're interested. i believe in property rights and desperate to know what happens. jennifer and jason
. governor brown says california needs to start investing more in education than in prison. in sacramento abc 7 news. >> perhaps, one more note from sacramento. a bill is in the works to give state workers back a holiday. if it passes state government will shut down and instead for native american bayday. the move reyou've r storing a day lawmakers took away in 2009. they currently have 11 paid holidays each year. >> two new san francisco supervisors were sworn in today. >> congratulations. >> and there they are. london joined four reelected superviseors serving for the next four years. the board named david hsu as president for a third time. >> bay area medical marijuana dispensary billing itself as nation's largest has won another round senate fit to stay open and refused to order harborside health center to stop selling pot. the government tries to prove that sent jer illegal, and must close. the landlords in oakland and san jose say they're at risk as long as pot is sold in their building because the attorney threatened to seize the rental properties fit continues to operate. >> fbi agent
years now, the first day of my second term, has been one of continuous education. i want to thank you for that. i want to introduce my family. i'm getting emotional. first off my beautiful wife karen cepeda [sounds like]. (applause) together we have two kids, renee and emiliana who are in school today. we have been through what close couples go through in terms of raising kids and facing adversity and figuring out how to make a household work. it has been wonderful 15 years. my mom is year, linda parks and stepfather. (applause) i think that what i really got % most of all from my mom % is really how to think and be thoughtful about the people. and i take that with me wherever i go. i draw inspiration from being around people. i want to say thank you for my life and what you have given me. my stepfather joe has given me a great opportunity, never expected that and i want to thank you for that. i wanted to do is my dad, hector avalos. it's time for resemblance i tihnk, for the gray look. my dad is important to me as well and taught me about the value of work. working with oth
of our board of education, -- mendoza. with that, mr. mayor, would like to join us? (applause) >> i would like to give our mayor the opportunity to say a few words on today's occasion. >> thank you everybody. happy new year! i wanted to be here the congratulate the supervisors who have been reelected, as well as the new elected supervisors and to welcome those families and friends who have come along way i'm sure, whether working with the newly elected, or alongside all of us for many years. i want to acknowledge the public officials that have been identified in the commissioners and department heads, for being here today. a sincere congratulations to board president chiu for you nomination in your reelection as board president. i look forward to working with you and with the whole board to continue the success of our city and to make sure that the dialogue but we have just heard, whether the celebration that supervisor yee had last night or london had today - sorry, supervisor breed, we are all still calling ourselves each by our first names - we continue making sure that the
of a public education enrichment fund expenditure plan for the school year, 2013-14, that will be moved to the meeting on the whole. >> you need a motion? i am sorry, yes i do. >> so moved. >> second. >> now it's referred to the committee as a whole on january 15. item r, board members' proposals for first reading none. item s, board members' reports, standing committees. i am sorry, do i do committees first or read it off. standing committees. we have a report from the buildings and ground committee. >> yes, the buildings and ground committee met on december 17th on two informational items. the first was an update on the current technology initiatives in sfsud. and i want to thank matt kensey and his team, we just have been able to advance by leaps and bounds. all of our schools are wired for the internet. there is still some last mile connectivity issues. but i want to acknowledge our previous superintendent, carlos garcia that made sure that was money in the qta dedicated to infrastructure. and some of you know in a previous life i worked in high-tech. and when i came to san francisc
there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to club owners and management personnel. >> thank you. wh
of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he
monthly income. >> you can enroll in free educational services online. just as it -- visit sfsmartmoney.org. with services like financial education classes and one-on-one meetings with advisers, asset smart money network makes it easy for you to learn all you need to know about managing, saving, investing, and protecting your money. the network offers access to hundreds of financial aid programs. to help their eruptions, fill out the quick questionnaire, and you will be steered to the program you are looking for. >> who want to make sure everyone has the chance to manage their money successfully, keep their money safe, and avoid getting ripped off. >> it sounds very good. i think people should try that one. >> to find out more, visit sfsmartmoney.org or call 211 and ask about the bank on s.f. program. >> now you can have a bank account. open one today. >> you're watching quick bite, the show that has san francisco. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> we're here at one of the many food centric districts of san francisco, the 18th street corridor which locals have affectionately dubbed the castro. a cross bet
to be stress relief. >> reporter: experts say more education is needed to help young women make wise choices about whether they should drink alcohol and how much. rehema ellis, nbc news, new york. >>> and we're back in a moment with the night the luck o' the irish ran out. ♪ chances are, you're not made of money, so don't overpay for motorcycle insurance. geico, see how much you could save. >>> we learned overnight one of the great nonfiction writers of our times, richard ben cramer, has died. if you were a young journalist in this country wanting to know how best to cover politics, campaigns and politicians, richard cramer's book "what it takes" it all it took. it chronicled the 1988 campaign as it focused on bush 41, on bush 41, dukakis, biden and all the educated at johns hopkins and columbia. richard ben cramer died of lung cancer at the age of 62. >>> well, you know how they say roll tide. the tide certainly rolled right over notre dame last night as alabama owned the bcs college championship game. from the get-go there were sad irish eyes all over this today. a 42-14 thumping for the
. they provide those buildings. they provide food. they provide free education. but the most -- that's what these children need, they need family care. they need a family that will provide love for them. that will love them. that will help them to go over all those difficult issues when teenagers grow. and every child deserves to be loved. and that's what this law proves. so that unfortunately, this is i call it not just anti-american law. this is inhumane law. >> george: sergei, i have seen what the russian ministries is doing across the soviet union and specifically dealing with orphans and going into orphanages and giving them a message of hope and encouraging them. how does this new law -- does it affect the way you guys operate at all? >> this is not going to affect our ministry in russia, i don't think, at all. but, you know, what we are doing now, pushing harder the issue of mobilizing national christian families to adopt their own children. and unfortunately, the number of orphans in those institutions is not decreasing. it is growing. and it shows clearly that there are some moral
spent 16 years in women education i applaud women going forward. i don't look like a person of color but if you look at my freckles i consider myself a person of color too. i have worked in district 3, closely with many supervisors. welcome to supervisor yee and breed, welcome aboard. this is a great group. in this me very proud to be a san franciscan, and to call him my supervisor. thank you very much. >> president: next speaker. >> good afternoon and happy new year to you all. it is a pleasure to be here. my name is mattie scott, the founder of healing for our families and our nation, working hard in san francisco over the last 16 years to stop senseless violence. i lost my youngest son to gun violence in 1996, july 17th. we have been ever since trying to educate the leaders, our children, law enforcement, the board of supervisors and everyone present so that we do have one of the situation. i am happy that my district supervisor, london breed, who grew up where my son was killed 16 years ago, is my supervisor for district 5. welcome london. i appreciate the work that yo
as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful organization to be involved wit
access issues. we have been working closely with many of our partners year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank all of you for coming. many of you may have assistance. i know many merchants could not be here. please do it share this information with other merchants in the area. we have virginia from the office of small business. we have roger from the bar association. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as
educational building will soon be equipped with computers for student and offer academic tutoring plus art and dance classes. >> in baltimore, obesity, diabetes are big issues. we believe it's important for mind, body and spirit to have things such as this. >> reporter: students are excited about the opportunities. >> now students can work on their projects outside of school. now they don't have an excuse because the city of baltimore is supporting them. >> reporter: another community partnership making a difference. >>> the educational building should be completed within three weeks to allow students taking classes. 15 schools are using the facility. >>> it's a shutout. some of baseball's biggest stars will not be getting into the hall of fame in coopers town. no player received enough votes to make this into cooperstown. 37 names were on the ballot including barry bonds, roger clemons, all embroiled in that steroid scandal and two of faced perjury charges. former red sox and oral pitch curt schilling was on the ball -- orioles pitcher curt schilling was on the ballot. >> there's a differ
justice -- getting education is a social justice issue. we don't want kids to feel they can't go to school or go home. we want other's worth intact and appreciate the worth. justice is a public face of love and 60% of kids who are discipline read likely to drop out of school, so if we attach the same concerns that we have for all of the students and comparing with the evidence base data that suggests there are a lairming rates of suspensions and explullions and how does that push the conversation or do other things that we are innovative with and coming up with real solutions? not just to bullying but all of the social factors that affect students and adults and there are several adults that need training as well. that's my point. >> yeah. actually the work place bullying institute which has good data i am told and found that 35% of american employees say that they have been bullied in the work place. that is about double over the figure for kids so this is not a kid problem, but so are you asking if there should be programs and campaigns aimed at minority students as a diffe
with public education but a new proposal outlined by the state superintendent of schools promises to be different. >> and i think parents across the state of california will be pleased to see a system that gets their students ready for the jobs and careers out there. >> reporter: there are 12 recommendations for revamping student testing. the most immediate, suspending star testing next year for second graders and make the switch to the new test. science assessments will be added and the state will consider alternatives to the current high school exit exam. a representative of the san ramon valley unified school district was excited. when was the last time you heard that? >> most of the teachers that i talk to say this is great because it allows us to be creative again. >> reporter: the goal is to phase out rote memorization and develop critical thinking and problem solving skills. eventually all students will take the test on computers and no two tests will be the same. the computer asks questions based on a student's previous answer to pinpoint
the chances of success for these people that get caught in these situations for their survival by education. we've got to stop making this a taboo subject to everyone because it's scary. we can't give up our rights because we're afraid. >> i suppose the only thing i would say to that is i believe the rights of a 6 or 7-year-old child to go to school without the fear of being murdered to me exceed and come higher than any rights to own an ar-15 assault rifle. that's my point. >> well, piers, i don't disagree with you. i don't think children should have to be going to school worrying about being murdered. but we have to accept reality. no matter what laws we pass, lord knows we have laws, and during the last assault weapons ban it didn't stop columbine from happening, it didn't stop the west hollywood shoot-out from happening. these things happen. there are criminals in our world that we have to contend with. and disarming people and taking the ar-15s out of their homes isn't going to help. there was a lady in georgia who shot a man six times. he laid down, cried, got up and left. now, imagin
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